• This 112 page book includes b/w photos, engravings, drawings, charts,and summaries of forts and camps built by the British, French, Colonies of Pennsylvania & Virginia, and private citizens during the French and Indian War. Especially helpful are the fort and site inventories which give the location, description, dates, and notes at a glance. A good reference work for scholars, but at the same time a key tool for the student of the period and/or archaeology. Family historians researching their ancestors may also find this work helpful. An index and annotated bibliography are also included.  
  • It is the result of 10 years of work from the last book. It takes us into Eastern Native American history in the mid to later part of the 18th century; a time of struggle and recovery for the eastern tribes. The text is written by Michael Galban, a good friend of Robert Griffing. Through his research he has been able to write wonder and engaging stories that relate well to the images. "The book has a nice flow to it making it an enjoyable read. I think it is important that these Eastern Native American images be seen and their story told, for they are a big part of our American history and should not be forgotten. Thank you." Robert Griffing
  • At last, from the undisputed expert on Rogers Rangers, here is the long-awaited chronicle of this tragic and infamous event. This phenomenal "commando" attack, initially successful, would be forever scarred by the violent deaths and starvation suffered by the Rangers during their return journey. Burt Loescher traveled thousands of miles tracing the routes of the separate Ranger parties, interviewing old-timers and descendants, and digging through hundreds of archival documents to painstakingly piece together the truth of the St. Francis Raid. There are many threads to this story, including its historical background, the events that occurred early in the expedition that foretold its outcome, and the separate agonies that befell the 11 groups of Rangers when the main force divided during the retreat from St. Francis. Extracts from actual Ranger diaries and journals provide authentic accounts of the journey, as well as shedding light on the personalities of the Rangers themselves. Many legends have grown around the story of the St. Francis Raid, most of them centering around the valuable silver and gold treasures stolen from the mission chapel by the Rangers and buried along the return routes when the men became too weak with hunger to continue to carry their heavy loads. Some say the Rangers were "cursed" for destroying and desecrating the mission. You will be able to retrace the separate trails by following the detailed descriptions and maps in this book. Mr. Loescher went far beyond Rogers own Journal accounts to get to the truth of the St. Francis Raid. He combed the documents in the Loudoun and Amherst Papers, colonial newspaper accounts, narratives, and, most importantly, some never-before published French accounts. He also disproves the legends that suffer from "credibility gaps." Many newly discovered facts completely change our currently held notions of the Raid, which have been shaped by the novel and motion picture. So much new evidence has been turned up that a definitive volume on the Raid was imperative. The exhaustive Appendices, detailed maps, and splendid color illustrations by well-known Ranger artist Gary Zaboly and Ron Embleton, make this study a complete source of reference for the historian, the treasure hunter, the Rogers Ranger enthusiast, as well as the lover of exciting early Americana.   
  • The year following the recapture of the Pittsburgh area, Bouquet's forces prepared for renewed French attacks which never occurred. Problems of maintaining a force in western Pennsylvania are the principal concern of the documents in this volume.
  • In 1759-1760, Fort Pitt and small fortifications to the north and south were built. Bouquet established a post on Presque Isle, while the French were losing the major campaign in Canada.
  • Bouquet was again placed in full command of the western region and found chronic dishonesty and desertion. Settlers and hunters were barred for fear of provoking the Indians, while the Redcoat units were trained for a campaign in the West Indies.  
  • The culminating events of Bouquet's career - Pontiac's Rebellion, the Battle of Bushy Run, the march to Ohio that ended the Indian insurgency in 1764, and Bouquet's appointment to command the Army of the Floridas - are captured in documents selected for this final printed volume, which closes in 1765 with his last known letter before his death in Florida - a love letter.
  •   Traditional 'Tic-Tac-Toe, Three In a Row' game.  Played by young and old alike for generations. Includes wooden game board, 2 sets of contrasting marbles , history and game rules.  
  • This collaborative effort from the Fort Ligonier Association, Bushy Run Battlefield, Fort Necessity National Battlefield and the Fort Pitt Museum traces the war for empire in western Pennsylvania from 1754-1763.  
  • Honorable Mention from the Association of American Publishers Professional and Scholarly Publishing Awards for History The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain, a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes, who suddenly found themselves under British rule, considered outrageous. Unlike the French, with whom Great Lakes Indians had formed an alliance of convenience, the British entered the upper Great Lakes in a spirit of conquest. British officers on the frontier keenly felt the need to assert their assumed superiority over both Native Americans and European settlers. At the same time, Indian leaders expected appropriate tokens of British regard, gifts the British refused to give. It is this issue of respect that, according to Gregory Dowd, lies at the root of the war the Ottawa chief Pontiac and his alliance of Great Lakes Indians waged on the British Empire between 1763 and 1767. In War under Heaven, Dowd boldly reinterprets the causes and consequences of Pontiac's War. Where previous Anglocentric histories have ascribed this dramatic uprising to disputes over trade and land, this groundbreaking work traces the conflict back to status: both the low regard in which the British held the Indians and the concern among Native American leaders about their people's standing―and their sovereignty―in the eyes of the British. Pontiac's War also embodied a clash of world views, and Dowd examines the central role that Indian cultural practices and beliefs played in the conflict, explores the political and military culture of the British Empire which informed the attitudes its servants had toward Indians, provides deft and insightful portraits of Pontiac and his British adversaries, and offers a detailed analysis of the military and diplomatic strategies of both sides. Imaginatively conceived and compellingly told, War under Heaven redefines our understanding of Anglo-Indian relations in the colonial period.
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